Free Hosting

Free Web Hosting with PHP, MySQL, Apache, FTP and more.
Get your Free SubDOMAIN you.6te.net or you.eu5.org or...
Create your account NOW at http://www.freewebhostingarea.com.

Cheap Domains

Cheap Domains
starting at $2.99/year

check

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma , 'Raa'ma 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Jai'ya 'Sh'ree 'Krish'na 'Chai'ton'ya! 'P'rub'hou-'Nit'yaa'nun'da! 'Sh'ree 'Ud'd'v'wai'ta! -

Paintings of India (Bharata) in the 1700's and early 1800's...

- 'Jai'ya 'Gud'dud'ha'ra! 'Sh'ree'v'va's'adi! 'Jai'ya 'G'aurr'a 'B'huk'ta 'V''rin'da! -

Ever wonder what India looked like before the revolting industrial revolution begun in the early 19th century? The following works are mostly from the 1700's and a few in the early 1800's. We can get a glimpse of what India really looked like before India became perverted by Industry. Although due to the effects of aging the color has faded a bit on all the works. Therefore the color has been enhanced to try and make them look like the way they were originally seen. An India collection is online and can be visited at Oriental and India Office Collection.

There are 14,000 paintings and drawings of temples, cities, landscapes and people, from all over India and Nepal from the same time period as the paintings below. Almost all are painted and drawn using the western "realism" technique.

Click on the paintings below to see the large version. More paintings may possibly be added as time goes on.

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma , 'Raa'ma 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

Watercolour of the Madan Mohan temple at Vrindavan from 'Views by Seeta Ram from Tughlikabad to Secundra Vol. VIII' produced for Lord Moira, afterwards the Marquess of Hastings, by Sita Ram between 1814-15. Marquess of Hastings, the Governor-General of Bengal and the Commander-in-Chief (r.1813-23), was accompanied by artist Sita Ram (flourished c.1810-22) to illustrate his journey from Calcutta to Delhi between 1814-15.

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma , 'Raa'ma 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

Oil painting on paper by Marianne North of Vrindavan, dated 2 November 1878. Marianne North visited India in 1877-79 and completed over 200 paintings whilst there. In her autobiography, 'Recollections of a happy life' of 1892, Marianne North wrote, "The temples of Vrindavan were magnificent,- every variety of architecture and all sorts of fanciful styles surrounding a poor mud village. The right bank of the Yamuna was lined with marble steps and balconies hanging over its waters. Many of the buildings were more like palaces than temples; others mere toy things with baby gardens- holy plants... Pilgrims were going in an endless procession from shrine to shrine, having fifteen miles to walk to visit all their holy places about Vrindavan."

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma , 'Raa'ma 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

Watercolour of Govinda Deo temple at Vrindavan from 'Views by Seeta Ram from Tughlikabad to Secundra Vol. VIII' produced for Lord Moira, afterwards the Marquess of Hastings, by Sita Ram between 1814-15. Marquess of Hastings, the Governor-General of Bengal and the Commander-in-Chief (r.1813-23), was accompanied by artist Sita Ram (flourished c.1810-22) to illustrate his journey from Calcutta to Delhi between 1814-15. Viewiew of the remains of the temple of Govindadeva at Vrindavan. Vrindavan is on the banks of the river Yamuna in Uttar Pradesh.

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma , 'Raa'ma 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

Plate 2 from the first set of Thomas Daniell's 'Oriental Scenery.' Vrindavan, north of Mathura, on the right bank of the river Yamuna, is the most famous pilgrimage place for Vaishnava pilgrims. This place is associated with the life and pastimes of the Lord Krishna who spent an idyllic youth among the cowherds and cowgirls, the gopas and gopis of Vraja, and is full of temples dedicated to Him. The one depicted by Daniell is the Madan Mohan temple, built in the 17th century of brick and terracotta and covered in terracotta plaques in the Bengali manner, reflecting the rescue of the holy sites by Bengal Vaishnavas in the 16th century.

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma , 'Raa'ma 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

Watercolour of a wooded hillside at Vrindavan, traditionally where Krishna sported with the gopis. From 'Views by Seeta Ram from Tughlikabad to Secundra Vol. VIII' produced for Lord Moira, afterwards the Marquess of Hastings, by Sita Ram between 1814-15. Marquess of Hastings, the Governor-General of Bengal and the Commander-in-Chief (r.1813-23), was accompanied by artist Sita Ram (flourished c.1810-22) to illustrate his journey from Calcutta to Delhi between 1814-15.

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma , 'Raa'ma 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

Aquatint with etching of a view of Mathura on the river Yamuna by James Moffat dated 1800-1815. Mathura, on the banks of the river Yamuna between Delhi and Agra, is a sacred city for Vaishnava devotees. Established as far back as 600 BC, it was famous as an important city of the Kushana empire in the 1st century AD. It was an artistic centre for several centuries, producing images for all the great religions of India. Its influence on Indian art declined when it was subjected to upheavals, most notably the sacking of the city by Mahmud of Ghazni in 1018. Mathura's fortunes revived when it became a centre for the Vaishnava cult by the 15th century and it is celebrated now above all as the site which Vaishnava tradition designates as the birthplace of Krishna, the originator of Vishnu.

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma , 'Raa'ma 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

This is the place where Krishna is said to have manifested (been born). There had been at least two previous temples to Krishna here that were torn down. There was a temple here that disappeared for some unknown reason before Chandragupta Vikramaditya built his temple which was destroyed by Mahmood Ghaznavi in 1017. The temple was rebuilt by Raja Veer Singh in 1663 and is believed to have been demolished by Aurangzeb in 1669, when the Idgah mosque was built at what was the original entrance to the temple complex.)

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma , 'Raa'ma 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

Plate 22 from the third set of Thomas and William Daniell's 'Oriental Scenery'. This view of the ancient city of Mathura, the most important of the seven holy cities of Vaishnavism, is taken from a garden pavilion on the opposite bank of the river Yamuna. Mathura is particularly associated with the pastimes of the Lord, Krishna. The principal buildings visible are the fort built by Raja Man Singh of Amber at the beginning of the 17th century, and the Jami Masjid with its four minarets, which was erected 1660-1668 by Aurangzeb's governor 'Abd al-Nabi Khan.

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma , 'Raa'ma 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

Plate twenty from '24 Views in Indostan by William Orme'. This composition is based on a picture by Francis Swaine Ward (1736-1794). It depicts the river Yamuna, as she flows past the fort at Mathura, in Uttar Pradesh. The fort, known as the Khans Qila, was built by Raja Man Singh of Amber in the early 17th Century. Mathura is most famous for being the birth place of Krishna, who is revered as the most worshipable deity in the Vaishnava tradition.

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma , 'Raa'ma 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

Watercolour of Vishram ghat from 'Views by Seeta Ram from Tughlikabad to Secundra Vol. VIII' produced for Lord Moira, afterwards the Marquess of Hastings, by Sita Ram between 1814-15. Marquess of Hastings, the Governor-General of Bengal and the Commander-in-Chief (r.1813-23), was accompanied by artist Sita Ram (flourished c.1810-22) to illustrate his journey from Calcutta to Delhi between 1814-15. Idealised view of the Vishram ghat on the river Yamuna at Mathura. Mathura, on the banks of the river Yamuna 150 kms south of Delhi, is a sacred city for Hindus. Mathura became a centre for the Vaishnava cult by the 15th century and it is celebrated now above all as the site which Vaishnava tradition designates as the birthplace of Krishna, the originator of Vishnu. As an important pilgrimage site there are literally hundreds of temples here. Vishram Ghat is the most important of the ghats of Mathura. Legend states that Krishna rested at this ghat after killing the demon Kamsa (hence the name Vishram which means 'repose').

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma , 'Raa'ma 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

Watercolour of temples in Santipur along the Bhagirathi River from an album of miscellaneous views of Bengal produced for Lord Moira, afterwards the Marquess of Hastings, by Sita Ram between 1820-21. Marquess of Hastings, the Governor-General of Bengal and the Commander-in-Chief (r.1813-23), was accompanied by artist Sita Ram (flourished c.1810-22) to illustrate his journey from Calcutta to Delhi between 1814-15 and his convalescent tour in the Rajmahal Hills in the winter of 1820-21.

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma , 'Raa'ma 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

Plate 21 from the first set of Thomas Daniell's 'Oriental Scenery.' Travelling along the river Ganges, the artists sketched many views and noticed, 'The banks of the Ganges are here very lofty, steep, and picturesque; but are subject to considerable alterations in the rainy season, as the river then rises to the height of thirty feet.' At that time, before the coming of railways, boats like the one in this view with a big sail were widely used for transport. It was the Daniells' baggage boat, and their palanquins can be seen lashed to the roof. Their own pinnace budgerow is in the distance. The actual site of the view is Naubasta, below the ancient city of Kara on the Ganges, with a small 18th century temple crowning the bluff.

- 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Krish'na , 'Krish'na 'Krish'na 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

- 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Raa'ma , 'Raa'ma 'Raa'ma 'Ha-'rey 'Ha-'rey -

Plate 17 from the fifth set of Thomas and William Daniell's 'Oriental Scenery' called 'Antiquities of India.' The group of structures in this print are close to the Gangadhareshvara temple, south of Bangalore. The Daniells wrote, 'The neighbourhood of Bangalore is remarkable for the frequent appearance of the remains of ancient Hindoo architecture. Nearly in the centre of this view is a temple, but at present without a deity. On the left is the Chakra (Discus) of Vishu placed horizontally, supported by a pillar, both executed in stone; and on the right is a pavilion very neatly executed, which was possibly the place for exhibiting to the multitude the deity belonging to the adjoining temple. Further on to the right is a stone pillar, on the top of which on particular occasions was placed a sacred fire.'

- 'Jai'ya 'Sh'ree 'Krish'na 'Chai'ton'ya! 'P'rub'hou-'Nit'yaa'nun'da! 'Sh'ree 'Ud'd'v'wai'ta! -

- 'Jai'ya 'Gud'dud'ha'ra! 'Sh'ree'v'va's'adi! 'Jai'ya 'G'aurr'a 'B'huk'ta 'V''rin'da! -

('Ha-'rey 'Krish'na!)